statistics

Fun Animal Statistics

by fifer1863 on February 3, 2014

Here are some fun Battle of Gettysburg related statistics to use with your students:

Between the two armies there were approximately 72,243 horses present. Of these, nearly 3,000 – 5,000 were killed.  What percentage was killed?

Each horse requires 10 gallons of water per day, making the water needs for just the horses 722,430 gallons per day.  Where could they get all this water in and around the town of Gettysburg? (hint:  use Google Earth)

Each horse normally consumed twelve pounds of grain (oats preferably) and fourteen pounds of hay per day, making those requirements 866,916 pounds of grain per day and 1,011,402 pounds of hay.  How many farms were located around Gettysburg that would have these supplies?

Each horse produces twelve to fifteen pounds of manure per day. Using an average  of thirteen and a half pounds that makes close to 975,281 pounds of manure per day!

And each horse produces two gallons of the urine per day creating a tidal wave of 144,486 gallons per day.

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As part of the 150th Civil War celebration, the Washington Post has created a special Civil War 150 website to share articles and resources related to the Civil War.  One of these is resources is an interactive map that shows battles and casualties from the war.

Civil War Battles and Casualties

Once you play the movie,  you start to see red dots appear on the screen indicating where a particular battle took place and the extent of the casualties.  The size of the red circle displays the number of casualties from less than 250 to 50,000.   At any time during the movie you can pause the movie and then hover over a red dot to learn more about the particular battle the date of the battle and the casualties.  If you notice the bar graph at the top of the page, you can also hover over the different bars to learn about the number of battles and casualties in a particular month / year. You can also view the red dots by year.

Civil War Battles and Casualties Map Detail

Applications for the classroom:

  • Have groups of students pick a particular year and write a summary of different battles and stats from that year
  • Ask probing questions like why were there fewer battles in December, January and February?
  • Have your students pick some battles based on different criteria and located them in Google Earth
  • Based on information by year or over all four years, talk about why particular battles were fought in certain geographic locations.  For example, why were there so many in Missouri in 1861?

 

Just a few ideas.  Be sure to explore the rest of the Civil War 150 website for more resources.

Until Next time…

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Yet Even MORE Statistics

by fifer1863 on June 28, 2010

Thanks to the Wig-Wags Blog for posting this interesting article on The Civil War’s Last Veterans, Wives and Stats to bring us even MORE statistics to ponder. Yippee!!

According to the post, the following table comes from Fact Sheet: America’s Wars by the US Department of Veteran’s Affairs:

Civil War (1861-1865)
Total U.S. Servicemembers (Union)…………..2,213,363
Battle Deaths (Union)………………………………140,414
Other Deaths (In Theater) (Union)………………..224,097
Non-mortal Woundings (Union)…………………..281,881
Total Servicemembers (Conf.) ………..1,050,000
Battle Deaths (Confederate) ………………74,524
Other Deaths (In Theater) (Confed.) (note 3, 4)……59,297
Non-mortal Woundings (Confed.) ……………..Unknown

Discussion questions for your class:

  1. What percentage of Total U.S. Servicemembers were killed in battle?
  2. What percentage of Total Confederate Servicemembers were killed in battle?
  3. According to the website, the Confederate figures are incomplete. Why do you think they are incomplete?

Now let’s add in some additional figures from the same website:

America’s Wars Total
U.S. Military Service During War…………….41,891,368
Battle Deaths………………………………………….651,022
Other Deaths (In Theater)………………………….308,797
Other Deaths in Service (Non-Theater)………….230,279
Non-mortal Woundings…………………………..1,431,290
Living War Veterans…………………………….17,484,000
Living Veterans (War & Peacetime)…………23,532,000

Based on this table ask your students:

  1. What percentage of soldiers fought during the Civil War when compared to all America’s Wars?
  2. What percentage of Union Battle Deaths make up the total for all America’s Wars?
  3. How would having more accurate Confederate data impact these figures?

Don’t you just love math. :)

Until next time….

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So many statistics….So little time

December 29, 2009

According to John Busey’s “These Honored Dead: The Union Casualties at Gettysburg”, the following is a list of the number of soldiers killed during the Battle of Gettysburg. Army Of the Potomac : New York 978 Pennsylvania 745 Massachusetts 200 Michigan 200 US Regulars 182 Ohio 139 Maine 119 Wisconsin 105 Indiana 96 New Jersey […]

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More Statistics…Still too little time

September 7, 2009

Well, I’m not a statistician by any means and I even struggled with the stats for my dissertation. But for some reason, I have quite a few blog posts on statistics. So, why not one more: The following tables are the number of Union and Confederate soldiers who were killed, wounded or captured during the […]

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Civil War Casualties

December 18, 2008

In order to better understand the impact that the Civil War had on the United States, it is important for students to review data of how many soldiers were killed, died from disease, died as a prisoner of war, and died in accidents. Information such as this was collected during it is currently available online. […]

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