Clara Barton

Support a Good Cause

by fifer1863 on May 9, 2013

I received the following email the other day and I encourage you to support this terrific cause

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I hope this finds you well.  I’m writing to ask for a favor.  The museum I’ve been working on, Clara Barton’s Missing Soldiers Office, is one of 24 finalists in a grant contest held by the National Trust for Historic Preservation.  The historic site with the top vote automatically received $100,000.00!  Although we peaked at 7th place, we’ve recently slipped to 11th, which will be out of the running.  All you need to do is register at the site and vote for Clara Barton’s Missing Soldiers Office every day through May 10.  Every time you share a post on Facebook about voting or retweet a message on Twitter that contains #clarabarton we receive extra points!  The website is http://www.preservedmv.com.

Please help me spread the word by asking your friends and family to vote for us!  Clara Barton began giving to anyone and everyone she could in need from the Civil War in 1861 to her death in 1912.  The Missing Soldiers Office is just one aspect of her extraordinary life that continues to support the military and civilians around the world today.  Winning this grant will enable us to restore and reinstall the original building’s windows.  Miss Barton deserves to have a first class museum to inspire others to continue her work.

THANK YOU in advance

Susan Rosenvold
Superintendent
Clara Barton’s Missing Soldiers Office
National Museum of Civil War Medicine
clarabarton@civilwarmed.org

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Google News Archive

by jtheiser on November 5, 2012

Here is a tool that I have been exploring and showing teachers how to use for a while now and it’s high time I shared it with you, my readers.

Google news provides you with the ability to search their archives going all the way back to the late 1800s.  This is a great tool to let your students do some historical research.

Searching the Google News Archive

Let’s say you want to search for articles on Clara Barton from the late 1800’s through the early 1900’s.

First, go to: http://news.google.com/archivesearch and enter in your search requirements.

Google News Search

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that you have entered your search criteria, click search and you can view the results.

Notice the dates of the results, the are all within our search range.  Next, let’s say you want to read the article about Clara writing to Mr. Roosevelt.  Simply click on the link and you can view a copy of the newspaper article.

Clara Barton Writes to Mr. Roosevelt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a great way for your students to do research and interact with primary sources.

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Clara Barton

by Sarah on May 31, 2009

Clara Barton is one of the most famous women in American history. So while in 4th grade, it came time for my daughter to do a report on a famous person from history, she chose Clara. What was even more fun was that she wanted to do a slide show of pictures about Clara as she gave her oral report. So, she searched the web for pictures and information about Clara and then I showed her how to load them into iPhoto and how to make a slide show. It was a lot of fun working on this with her and we both learned a good bit about Clara and iPhoto, Garageband and iTunes.

So, I thought I would take her oral report and share some of it in a blog post, along with some of the photos, information and links about Clara that Sarah found.

Clara was born in 1821 in New Oxford, Massachusetts. My parents are Sarah Stone Barton and Capt. Stephen Barton. I have two brothers named David and Stephen and two sisters named Sarah and Dorothy (or Dolly).

This is a picture of the home where Clara was born.

Growing up Clara was a shy girl and enjoyed riding her horse. One day when David was out working on the barn roof he fell and broke his arm. The doctor told Clara that he may die, but she made a wish that he would not and cared for him for several weeks and her wish came true.

Clara’s brother and sister grew up to become teachers. In 1850, Clara became a teacher in this one-room schoolhouse. She earned praise when she refused to physically punish students. Clara liked to think that she left a mark on each school in which she taught, organizing the classroom and drafting lesson plans.

In 1861 when the civil war began I followed the troops taking care of the wounded soldiers. Clara and other women would care for the wounded soldiers by giving them food, bandaging their injuries and writing letters for them to their families.



During the Battle of Antietam in September 1862, Clara saw many wounded and dying soldiers everywhere she walked. They were in barns, in cornfields and even in the Dunker Church. These pictures show some of the wounded soldiers from the Battle of Antietam that she nursed back to health.


Although it is widely believed that Clara was set up on the Joseph Poffenberger farm on the north end of the battlefield, according to Ranger Mannie Clara was actually at the Samuel Poffenberger farm, a little more to the east. This is a modern photograph of the Samuel Poffenberger farmhouse, which is where she stayed for a week or so.


There is a monument at the Antietam National Battlefield to Clara that says:

DURING THE BATTLE OF ANTIETAM SEPTEMBER 17, 1862 CLARA BARTON BROUGHT SUPPLIES AND NURSING AID TO THE WOUNDED ON THIS BATTLEFIELD THIS ACT OF LOVE AND MERCY LED TO THE BIRTH OF THE PRESENT AMERICAN NATIONAL RED CROSS THIS SYMBOLIC RED CROSS HAS BEEN MADE FROM A BRICK FROM THE CHIMNEY OF THE HOME WHERE CLARA BARTON WAS BORN AT NORTH OXFORD, MASSACHUSETTS ON CHRISTMAS DAY, 1821


Beginning in 1870, Clara spent 10 years organizing the American National Red Cross, which was officially incorporated in 1882. Under my leadership the Red Cross assisted with relief efforts following disasters like floods, forest fires, and earthquakes.


Thanks to Ranger Mannie from Antietam National Battlefield, Ranger Smith from Gettysburg Battlefield and Mr. Joe Korber of the 119th New York Field Music and The Sykes Regulars for information on Clara, photos and music for this presentation.

So, that was the bulk of her report. A few points to consider: 1) Sarah’s school has very little in terms of technology so it was great for her to show the other kids, 2) This provided me a change to help Sarah learn how to research a topic on the Internet, 3) I made sure that she asked permission to use photos and music for her presentation that were not in the public domain and 4) her class got to see a great presentation using technology.

A few more quick photos.
This is Sarah at the Clara Barton monument


and

Here is Sarah, holding her Junior Ranger certificate and badge, with Ranger Mannie.


Additional photos and information about Clara are available on the web at these sites:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clara_Barton
http://www.civilwarhome.com/bartonbio.htm
http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/trm072.html
http://www.cr.nps.gov/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/27barton/27barton.htm
http://www.clarabarton.org/

Updated from the old blog:  Check out Sarah’s new project Civil War Sallie who recently visited the Clara Barton home and wrote a two-part blog post on her visit.  Check out Part 1 and Part 2

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Clara Barton Short Story

January 23, 2009

I had to write a short story for my literature class so I decided to write about Clara Barton at the Battle of Antietam.  Hope you enjoy reading my story. ——————————————————————————————————————————————– It was September 17, 1862 and in the small town of Sharpsburg, Maryland a major battle of the Civil War was taking place.  Soldiers […]

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My Angel of the Battlefield

November 12, 2008

My daughter Sarah and I recently presented at the Pennsylvania Council for the Social Studies conference in Gettysburg.  I presented on ideas for Using Technology to Teach the Civil War and as part of my presentation, Sarah talked about her 4th grade biography project on Clara Barton.  I’m very proud of how well is presenting […]

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